Monday, March 24, 2014

Volkswagen Golf 2016

The Volkswagen Group is one of the best examples of the new mega-manufacturing machines of the automotive industry. As a family of nine automotive brands, it has the ability to fill just about every mainstream, enthusiast, and barely scratched market. There are several advantages to this combined manufacturing force. One, economy and emissions ratings for smaller efficient models like the Golf and Polo can be used to offset less-efficient models like Aventadors and R8s in corporate averages.

Two, technology used to make supercars from Lamborghini and Audi lighter and faster can be used to make Volkswagens lighter and more efficient. Bringing composite and aluminum-alloy manufacturing technology from low- to larger-volume cars also spreads the cost out, bringing prices down.To maximize every gallon of fuel, engineers must think beyond the car. The driving environment will play as big a role as the vehicles rolling through it. Cars will communicate with each other to help navigation systems plan the most efficient routes with traffic. Terrain will be calculated to avoid unnecessary altitude changes and parking data can be transmitted to avoid driving in circles looking for that last spot.The following predictions for the 2016 Volkswagen Golf MK8 are based on technology currently being developed. How much of it comes to fruition is still unknown.

This particular model would likely never make it to the United States, at least not in as few as five years. A combined diesel and electric 85 horsepower wouldn't suffice for North American driving habits even with reduced weight. VW is currently in the process of building an engine factory in Mexico slated to be up and running for the Golf MK7. The rumored product of the factory is a 1.8-liter direct-injection I-4 to replace the current 2.5-liter I-5 in Golf, Jetta, Beetle, and Passat. VW has announced both a plug-in hybrid and a full electric Golf for near future production, likely in 2013. The odds of a sub-1.0-liter engine powering the U.S.-spec hybrid at that time are low. Even by 2016 it is still unlikely, as motor and battery technology would need to make considerable advances in power and range. We shouldn't count on ever seeing a Golf with fewer than a combined 150 horsepower in the forseeable future. A new smaller car built here in the new Tennessee factory with less power? That isn't so unlikely.

Read more:


http://www.motortrend.com/future/future_vehicles/1108_2016_volkswagen_golf_inside_and_out/#ixzz2wqhmLLe

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